Maui, Hawaii is Just a Click Away

  • Population

    154,834 people

  • Location

    South Pacific, Hawaiin Islands

  • Shopping

    Maui’s best shopping is found in the small, independent boutiques and galleries scattered around the island—particularly in Makawao and Paia.

The island of Maui has something for everyone. The dormant Haleakala volcano (though officially classified as “active”) and Kahalawai volcano watch over Hawaii’s second largest island and shape the island’s mountains, valleys and waterfalls. Visitors to Maui are surprised by how undeveloped most of the island feels, and yet how much it offers in terms of dining, resorts and nightlife. Maui is also the whale watching center for the islands (the humpback whale is the state animal). Driving to the top of Haleakala to watch the sunrise is a Maui visitor ritual (many opt to bike back down from the top), as is a drive around the island”s perimeter on the 50 mile Hana Highway.

Great Flights

Flying these days is simple. If your local airport is an international airport and you’re flying internationally, that will most likely save you some time. If your local airport isn’t an international airport, be prepared for the travel time to be a bit longer.

Extra Luggage

Think carefully when packing. You might not need so much, many of your days will be spent relaxing in the sun. Depending on which airline you fly, extra fees might apply for additional suitcases.

Cancellation Policies

Make sure to ask us about trip insurance. You might not think it’s worth it, sometimes things come up that are inevitable. The small investment could save you a huge headache as well as a saved expense!

About Maui, Hawaii

A Maui vacation will tantalize all of your senses. The big tourist spots in Maui include the Hāna Highway, Haleakalā National Park, Iao Valley, and Lahaina.

The Hāna Highway runs along the east coast of Maui, curving around mountains and passing by black sand beaches and waterfalls. Haleakalā National Park is home to Haleakalā, a dormant volcano. Lahaina is one of the main attractions on the island with an entire street of shops and restaurants which leads to a wharf where many set out for a sunset cruise or whale watching journey. Snorkeling can be done at almost any beach along the Maui coast. Surfing and windsurfing are also popular on Maui.

The main tourist areas are West Maui (Kāʻanapali, Lahaina, Nāpili-Honokōwai, Kahana, Napili, Kapalua) and South Maui (Kīhei, Wailea-Mākena). The main port of call for cruise ships is located in Kahului. There are also smaller ports located at Lahaina Harbor (located in Lahaina) and Maʻalaea Harbor (located between Lahaina and Kihei). Are you ready for your Maui vacation?

Passport & Visa Information

Since Hawaii is the 50th state, you won’t need to bring your passport unless you’re visiting from outside the United States or traveling to another country after Hawaii.

Learn more about passports here.

The Language

Hawai’i is also the only American state to have two official languages, Hawaiian and English. However, a 3rd unofficial language is also widely spoken, Pidgin which is a slang combining words from many aspects of island life and culture. A pidgin or creole language spoken in Hawaiʻi is Hawaiian Pidgin (or Hawaii Creole English, HCE). It should not be mistaken for the Hawaiian language nor for a dialect of English. The Hawaiian alphabet has 12 letters: five vowels (long and short) and seven consonants.

Odds & Ends

Time Zone: Hawaii-Aleutian Time Zone UCT -10 hours. No Daylight Savings Time is used in Maui

World Clock

Currency: The official currency in Maui is the dollar (USD).  US currency is accepted everywhere and other major currencies can be exchanged at banks.  ATMs in Maui accept credit and debit cards.

Electricity: Electric current in Maui is 120 volts, 60Hz.  Flat two- and three-pin plugs are standard.